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Specialized S-Works SL Pavé Carbon Seatpost

Specialized S-Works SL Pavé Carbon Seatpost

Product Rating
4.0 stars
 (1 Review)

Product Details

Specialized S-Works SL Pavé Carbon Seatpost

The more comfortable you are, the more you'll ride. That's what the Specialized S-Works SL Pave Carbon Seatpost is all about. To make it all happen, this great post fights bumps and vibrations two ways. First, it's made of Specialized's FACT 3k SL carbon, which takes the edge off rough roads thanks to its natural damping characteristics. And second, its Zertz elastomer insert damps vibrations for increased comfort. This lightweight post allows you to fine-tune your saddle position with a single-bolt adjustable head and two setback options.

Features and Information

  • Diameter: 27.2mm
  • Length: 350mm
  • Weight: 200 grams
  • Part Numbers close open

    Option Barcode Manufacturer's Part Number Vendor Number
    21mm 00719676210681 281E-3250 SBC-281E-3250
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    by PowerReviews
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    4.0 stars

    (based on 1 review)


    of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

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    definitely recommend, with minor caveats

    By lonefrontranger

    from Boulder, CO

    About Me


    I got this post as part of the OEM build on my '14 Crux Pro Disc. While it looks extremely good on that particular bike from an aesthetic / design standpoint, the main issue I had with it is that I am a 5'4" rider with a 30" inseam on a 49cm bike. Because of the Zertz design, this post simply does not accommodate enough vertical adjustment for the Zertz to clear the seat collar when lowering the saddle to fit a small / short legged rider. I inserted it in the frame as far as it would go before the Zertz just simply prevented it from budging, and it was still a smidge too high. Even then the collar dug into the base of the Zertz and scarred them, despite that it still had roughly 15mm of index marks remaining above the collar on the insertion scale. I've encountered these kinds of weird design limitations on small bikes before. Things like spec'ing a 400mm seatpost stock on a 47cm road frameset such that you have to replace it or cut it so it doesn't get stuck on the cage bosses in the seat tube, etc. So, basically the dudes in engineering don't much consider the riders on the far left hand tail of the distribution curve, which I guess is fine as we're a tiny #heh# fraction of the user base. Also of note is that a single bolt seatpost is not a great design cue on a cyclocross bike - landing on the saddle a half dozen times per lap and bouncing across frozen ruts on a rigid skinny tire frame, etc., creates some pretty radical / eccentric torque and leverage forces that I'm not sure exist in other disciplines. Despite not being a big/heavy rider at all, and using a torque wrench and cleaning / re-prepping the interface with blue loctite, I had quite a bit of trouble keeping the saddle tilt adjustment dialed in and found my saddle to have slipped / rotated a couple times during races. Added to the problem of having the seat just a fraction too high, which is not-great for 'cross, I ultimately opted to switch it out for a different carbon aftermarket seatpost; problem solved. HOWEVER, that said, this seatpost has been beyond fantastic, rock solid stable and wonderfully shock absorbing on my Stumpjumper Comp 29er hardtail, and it weighs about a third of what the stock alloy post did. It has just the right amount of cush to prevent impact from going straight up my spine when I'm having to thrash it over rough ground, without sapping power transfer on the climbs. It's almost like having a suspension post without the added weight, cost, or maintenance issues. So far it also seems the saddle angle problem isn't an issue on the mountain bike. No doubt because I'm not jumping on it fifty times a race, not to mention larger volume MTB tires soak up bigger ground impacts, plus on a MTB hardtail you're usually, or should be, out of the saddle going over big hits. Owing to the problems I had with it slipping on the Crux, I was leery using a single bolt "roadie" post on our tough rocky jeep roads and rowdy descents at the local cross country series, but I was reluctant to get rid of such a nice carbon post. So far it has been excellent. Plus it looks sharp on my Stumpy. Overall I'm quite pleased with this simple little piece of tech. Though not in use for its original intent, it does fill an odd but necessary niche quite well. I have been racing road, cross and mountain bikes for the past quarter century, and for various reasons have never had Specialized bikes until recently. I only wish I'd tried one sooner.

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    Originally posted on Specialized - BV's website

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